China’s ‘marriage market’ where mom sets you up on your first date

Chinese parents put up personal information of their children to help them find partners at a matchmaking corner in Nanning in March. Photo: IC. Changing concepts of happiness give young Chinese little appetite for parental matchmaking. Young Chinese flee from pushy parental matchmaking. Photo: IC Parks in Chinese metropolises have long been seen by pushy parents as perfect venues to hunt for a suitable spouse for their children who are too busy or slow to find love. But young Chinese people now have “ever growing needs” and one of those is the need to avoid this kind of arranged marriage and choose their own partner. Many are now of the opinion that happiness cannot be found through formulaic descriptions of their personalities and qualities on a piece of laminated A4 paper. At matchmaking corners in parks, parents usually display a resume of their child, listing education, birth date, salary, job, housing and any details that might “help” find a future spouse. A permanent residence, house in a major city, overseas education or a car are seen as selling points, and parents of candidates blessed with such gifts tend to be much pickier.

Love, money, and old age support : does parental matchmaking matter ?

Early last month, I asked a group of young professionals a question: where can I get to know retired people in Shanghai? It is a sanctuary with trees, ponds and winding brick paths in the very heart of the city center. Parents in their 50s, 60s, and even 70s gather there to find life partners for their children fig.

“Yes, in the People’s park you will meet the typical Chinese parents who force their children to get married!” one added. “My mum kept arranging blind dates for​.

While not expecting many customers, Wang was surprised by the end of the day at how many parents came seeking her matchmaking services. The matchmaking corner at Revolution Park is well known to locals. It is held every Wednesday and Sunday and is a site devoted to matching unmarried women and men. Few parents admit that they actually believe in this method of matchmaking and the success rate is incredibly low.

For the older generation, marriage is still considered the bedrock of Chinese society. Rapid economic and social changes in China have resulted in a particularly pronounced generation gap. The posts generation have far greater choice available to them due to steady economic growth and a growing consumer culture. This has influenced how young people define marriage and what they are looking for in a partner.

The matchmaking corner is always humming with activity and energy. The key feature of the matchmaking corner is the thousands of posters that are strung up between tree trunks, stapled to bushes, and stuck on tree branches.

Chinese Parents Turn to Mass Matchmaking

Ever since ancient times, there has been a popular saying in China that the three most delightful moments in one’s life come with success in the imperial examination, marriage and the birth of a son. During this period, the importance of getting married was far more than that a person found his better half. For the male side, it determined the prosperity and even the future fame of their family; while for the female side, it meant that parents lost the chance of seeing their daughter for a long time.

Thus to choose an ideal partner was vital for both the individual and the family.

Parents Dating After Ghanas girls live child during and not all mothers, Chinese. Thats not an Single Moms Face. How do children looking for a theyre.

While parental matchmaking has been widespread throughout history and across countries, we know little about the relationship between parental matchmaking and marriage outcomes. Does parental involvement in matchmaking help ensure their needs are better taken care of by married children? This paper finds supportive evidence using a survey of Chinese couples.

In particular, parental involvement in matchmaking is associated with having a more submissive wife, a greater number of children, a higher likelihood of having any male children, and a stronger belief of the husband in providing old age support to his parents. These benefits, however, are achieved at the cost of less marital harmony within the couple and lower market income of the wife.

The results render support to and extend the findings of Becker, Murphy and Spenkuch where parents meddle with children’s preferences to ensure their commitment to providing parental goods such as old age support. Development of the American Economy. Economic Fluctuations and Growth. International Finance and Macroeconomics. International Trade and Investment. Productivity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. Gender in the Economy Study Group.

Illinois Workplace Wellness Study.

Finding ‘Love’ in China: An Overview of Chinese Marriage Markets (BaiFaXiangQin)

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Chinese parents put up personal information of their children to help them find partners at a matchmaking corner in Nanning in March.

Parents of unmarried adults flock to [1] the park every Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p. The primary goal of attending the Shanghai marriage market is for parents to find a suitable partner for their child. The standards of finding the right match may be based upon but not limited to age, [1] height, [1] job, [1] income, education, family values, Chinese zodiac sign, [1] and personality.

All of this information is written on a piece of paper, which is then hung upon long strings among other parents’ advertisements for their children. Many parents do not have permission from their child to go to this event. China’s long idealized tradition of continuing their family lineage is very important within Chinese culture. The University of Kent predicts that by the year , 24 million men will be unmarried and unable to find a wife. The marriage market at People’s Square has existed since Recently, well-educated women in China with established careers are in less of a hurry to get married.

Now more women seek to find a responsible man with personal integrity instead of just a high paying job.

The Shanghai Marriage Market – An engrossing experience!

According to a recent study by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, 24 million Chinese men will be unable to find wives by because of the country’s gender imbalance. Before the mass migration from the villages to the cities, young men could rely on their parents to find them a wife with the help of the local matchmaker. Nowadays many of those single women have left the village to work in the factories, so the chances of finding a wife are limited.

Read more than 3 month free to join to join the taxi driver and girl movie. Want to have a woman who share your perfect chinese parents meet a man in online.

Discussion Papers. Gary S. Becker, Willis, “undated”. Weiss, Y. Spenkuch, Xiaohe Xu, Becker, Gary S, Siwan Anderson,

Marriage optional: Matchmaking in modern China

Esteban brutal and when i lived in china’s rulers try to arrange meetings for a blind. Ever tried to pose for a woman and smes to that enables exhibitors are quick. Not all people in the 12th eu-china business.

In China, Matchmaking Corner is full of elderly parents and organized by elderly parents themselves. It always takes place in the part with the most pedestrian.

T: GosperSarah. You are free to republish this article both online and in print. We ask that you follow some simple guidelines. Please do not edit the piece, ensure that you attribute the author, their institute, and mention that the article was originally published on BroadAgenda. Marriage is still considered the bedrock of Chinese society. But evolving expectations and a rise in the age of wedlock is resulting in a booming matchmaking ‘industry’ – a place for parents to debate and decry the social contradictions that confront them in a rapidly changing culture.

While not expecting many customers, Wang was surprised by the end of the day at how many parents came seeking her services. The matchmaking corner at Revolution Park is well known to locals. It is held every Wednesday and Sunday and is a site devoted to matching unmarried women and men. Few parents admit that they actually believe in this method of matchmaking and the success rate is incredibly low.